Lakes and Rivers

We’re committed to preserving and improving the quality of fish populations in and around our facilities. Fishing is a favorite activity in Georgia Power reservoirs and a major public benefit of the numerous hydropower facilities we own.


Fisheries Management and Fish Habitat

Fishing is a favorite activity in Georgia Power reservoirs and a major public benefit of the numerous hydropower facilities we own. Georgia Power works closely with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and other interested agencies and groups to study and manage our fishery resources in a way that promotes outdoor recreation and ensures those resources are around for future generations of Georgians.

We have helped fund the stocking of walleyes in some of our lakes for years to provide a unique target for anglers in Georgia. We consider fish habitat as an important component of our aquatic vegetation management strategies. Additionally, we’ve expended considerable time and resources toward the conservation of unique, native stream fishes such as the shoal bass and the State Endangered robust redhorse sucker.

Even mussels get in on the action, as we’re working on a plan to conserve several species of these unique invertebrates in the Altamaha River basin. We also participate in Southern Company’s partnership with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and other groups, the Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program, which helps fund community-based partnerships to conserve water resources.


Water Quality and Aquatic Plant management

By promoting the growth of native aquatic plants, we can effectively contribute to fish habitat and the overall health of aquatic ecosystems.

Georgia Power Lakes

Georgia Power owns 17 lakes across the state, constructed for hydroelectricity generation, the most widely-used and established renewable energy source. Our lakes account for approximately 60,000 surface acres of water, offering hundreds of shoreline miles with public access areas. These public access areas provide Georgians with opportunities for swimming, boating, fishing, camping, picnicking, and nature-watching.

Water Quality measurements

We are committed to tracking the ecological health of our water resources by conducting water quality monitoring. We monitor physical and chemical aspects of water quality in all Georgia Power reservoirs quarterly for key water quality measurements.

Our biologists track seasonal variations in water quality trends and cooperate with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and Georgia Environmental Protection Division to ensure that current and future generations may enjoy our lakes and their healthy ecosystems.

Our staff biologists annually conduct Aquatic Plant Management (APM) activities in all of our lakes for the purposes of monitoring for and suppressing exotic invasive aquatic plants. Exotic plant species have the potential to limit boating access, negatively affect water quality, outcompete native plant species, contribute to wildlife disease issues, and even complicate hydropower generation capabilities. By promoting the growth of native aquatic plants, we can effectively contribute to fish habitat and the overall health of aquatic ecosystems.